Firearm Foley: Vintage Rifles

Firearm Foley: Vintage Rifles HD • Files: 96 (1200+) • Zip Size: 172MB • Price: $50.00

Presenting Firearm Foley: Vintage Rifles HD Professional Sound Effects Collection. Polished, hardened steel and decades old wood stock give these rifles a distinct sound not heard with today’s rifles made of modern plastics and composite materials.

Recorded with a pair of Sennheiser microphones, one positioned to the side of the gun and the other at the front to a Sound Devices 702 recorder at 24 Bit / 96kHz. The extreme pitch ability of the MKH-8050 along with the classic “shotgun” sound of the MKH-416 give you a multitude of options when designing rifle handling sounds.

A wide range of actions were performed including bolt actions, magazines (empty and loaded), triggers, switches, levers, hand grabs along with various movements and shaking. The guns used to create this collection were in pristine “collector” condition. They were kept well oiled and clean. The sounds are bright, clean and solid without any rough edges.

Guns-Vintage-Rifles-Wide-Pic

The Rifles:
1953 International Harvester M1 Garand .30-06 (7.62×63mm) • 1943 Underwood M1 .30 Carbine • 1990 Springfield M1A .308 (7.62x51mm) • 1943 Remington 03A3 .30-06 • 1956 Chinese SKS “Type 56″ (7.62x39mm)

Equipment Used:

Sound Devices 702 – Sennheiser MKH-8050 – Sennheiser MKH-416

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Firearm Foley: Vintage Rifles HD • Files: 96 (1200+) • Zip Size: 172MB • Price: $50.00
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PHOTOS

Gun-M1-Carbine-1943

The M1 carbine is a lightweight, easy-to-use semi-automatic carbine that became a standard firearm for the U.S. military during World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War, and was produced in several variants. It was widely used by U.S. and foreign military, paramilitary and police forces, and has also been a popular civilian firearm.

Gun-Remington-03A3-1943

The M1903 Springfield, formally the United States Rifle, Caliber .30-06, Model 1903, is an American clip-loaded, 5-round magazine fed, bolt-action service rifle used primarily during the first half of the 20th century. It was officially adopted as a United States military bolt-action rifle on June 19, 1903, and saw service in World War I. It was officially replaced as the standard infantry rifle by the faster-firing semi-automatic 8 round M1 Garand starting in 1937. However, the M1903 Springfield remained in service as a standard issue infantry rifle during World War II. It also remained in service as a sniper rifle during World War II, the Korean War, and even in the early stages of the Vietnam War. It remains popular as a civilian firearm, historical collector’s piece, and as a military drill rifle.

Gun-M1A-1990

The M1A is a civilian version of the M14 rifle designed and manufactured by Springfield Armory, Inc. in 1974. The term “M1A” is a proprietary title for Springfield Armory’s M14 pattern rifle. Early M1A rifles were built with surplus G.I. parts until Springfield Armory, Inc. began manufacturing their own.

Gun-M1-Garand-1953

The M1 Garand is a semi-automatic rifle chambered for the .30-06 Springfield rifle cartridge. It was the first standard-issue semi-automatic rifle.[5] Called “the greatest battle implement ever devised” by General George S. Patton,[6] the Garand officially replaced the bolt-action M1903 Springfield as the standard service rifle of the United States Armed Forces in 1936 (although the switch-over was not instantaneous) and was subsequently replaced by the selective fire M14, starting in 1957. During World War II, the M1 gave U.S. forces a distinct advantage in firefights against their Axis enemies, as their standard-issue rifles were slower-firing bolt-action rifles. The M1 continued to be used in large numbers until 1963 and to a lesser degree until 1976. Like its predecessor, the M1 originated from the Springfield Armory.

Gun-SKS-China-Type-56

The SKS is a Soviet semi-automatic carbine chambered for the 7.62×39mm round, designed in 1943 by Sergei Gavrilovich Simonov. Its complete designation, SKS-45, is an initialism for Samozaryadnyj Karabin sistemy Simonova, 1945, or SKS 45. In the early 1950s, the Soviets took the SKS carbine out of front-line service and replaced it with the AK-47; however, the SKS remained in second-line service for decades. It is still used as a ceremonial arm today. The SKS was widely exported, and was also produced by some former Eastern Bloc nations as well as China, where it was designated the “Type 56″, East Germany as the Karabiner S and in North Korea as the “Type 63″. The SKS is currently popular on the civilian surplus market in many countries, including the United States, Canada and New Zealand. It was one of the first weapons chambered for the 7.62×39mm M43 round, which was also used later in the AK-47.

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