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Beech 58P Airplane Recording Videos

Beech 58P 2011 Recording

Here are two videos recorded while I was capturing the sound from a 1980 Beechcraft Baron 58P prop plane. The first video is from camera one (Sanken CSS-5 audio) that my wife kindly shot. She also took over 150 photos of the short lived action. The second video is from camera two (Sennheiser MKH-8040ST audio), my somewhat feeble attempt to get video and sound at the same time. I forgot to bring the “Boomcam” gizmo that attaches the Flip HD camera under the microphone so I was holding it in my other hand the best I could.

I will be getting around to a complete blog post detailing the experience. It was very fast paced but totally enjoyable. I got some great sounds for a new library that will be released soon. Enjoy the sights and sounds! -Frank

Airplane Recording Aug 18th 2011 Part-1, Camera 1

Recording the sound of a 1980 fixed wing multi engine Beechcraft Baron 58P propeller plane. This video contains the footage from video camera 1 operated by my wife as I was recording the airplane. The sound is from a Sanken CSS-5 microphone which I had on a boom pole following the airplanes’ movements. I recorded the plane at 24-Bit/96k to a Sound Devices SD-702 that was sync locked to another with a stationary MKH-8040ST microphone rig on a microphone stand.

I only had an hour to record the plane so I had to have a minimal set up that could be moved around the airstrip. This first part in the video series showcases the sights and sounds of engine run-ups, ground taxiing and pass by’s from the CSS-5 perspective.

Airplane Recording Aug 18th 2011 Part-2, Camera 2

Recording the sound of a 1980 fixed wing multi engine Beechcraft Baron 58P propeller plane. This video contains the footage from video camera 2 operated by myself as I was recording the airplane. The sound is from a Sennheiser MKH-8040ST microphone which I had set on a microphone stand. I recorded the plane at 24-Bit/96k to a Sound Devices SD-702 that was sync locked to another with a boom pole mounted Sanken CSS-5 microphone.

This second part in the video series showcases the sights and sounds of engine run-ups, ground taxiing and pass by’s from the MKH-8040ST perspective.

Interior sounds from a PCM-D1

Airplane Prop Interior Beech 58P Start
Airplane Prop Interior Beech 58P Start by therecordist

Airplane Prop Interior Beech 58P Takeoff
Airplane Prop Interior Beech 58P Takeoff by therecordist

Airplane Prop Interior Beech 58P Landing
Airplane Prop Interior Beech 58P Landing by therecordist

PHOTO GALLERY

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Beech 58P 2011 Photo

Recording a 1928 Stearman C3B Bi-Plane 2011

1928 Stearman C3B Engine Start Boomcam Perspective 2011

Here is a J5 Wright powered 1928 Stearman C3B starting its engine. The video was shot with a Flip HD (3rd Gen) mounted on my Sanken CSS-5 microphone boom pole. This is the complete video with the CSS-5 audio recorded at 24/96. This plane was not flying during the show but at the end of the day I was able to meet the owner and his friends (it takes more then one person to get these planes started). They were getting ready to fly home as I walked by after recording at the north end of the airport. I asked the pilot if I could record it and he said only if you give me the sound for my cell ringtone. “Deal” I told him. After they rolled it out and charged the starter she was running. He ran the engine at different RPMs until I gave him the thumbs up that I recorded enough for his ringtone. I then walked along side the plane while it headed for the runway. I was able to move down field and record the plane taking off and passing by.

1928 Stearman C3B Engine Flying Boomcam Perspective 2011

Here is the J5 Wright powered 1928 Stearman C3B starting its engine. The video was shot with a Flip HD (3rd Gen) mounted on my Sanken CSS-5 microphone boom pole. This is the video of the plane taking off and then passing by at the Sandpoint Idaho Airport with the CSS-5 audio recorded at 24/96.

1928 Stearman C3B Engine Start Far Perspective 2011

Here is the J5 Wright powered 1928 Stearman C3B starting its engine. The video was shot with a Fujifilm picture camera by my wife. This is the video of the plane starting and myself with the Sanken CSS-5 recording the sound.

The blog post from the Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011 is here

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011-08-13

It’s been a year since my last recording session at the Sandpoint Idaho air show and fly in. Last year I focused mainly on engine run-ups and take-offs from the south end of the airfield. This year I decided to hang out at the north end of the runway and get pass by’s and ground taxiing as the planes landed. There were lots of different types of prop airplanes flying around including a 1928 Stearman that was not there in 2010.

The Rig

I brought along my Flip HD camera mounted on the boom pole just under the Sanken CSS-5 Stereo Shotgun Microphone and the SD-702 recorder. I chose the CSS-5 because I was happy with the results I got last year and it held up well in the 90+ degree heat. The CSS-5 is fairly good at rejecting off axis sounds even in the narrow stereo mode. It is a little heavy and my back was sore from the long day of recording.

The Flip HD “Boomcam” worked out surprisingly well even though my main focus was on the microphone angle and direction. The Flip HD screen is hard to see wearing sunglasses so most of the time I just hoped the plane was in the shot. Only a few times did I notice a plane it being out of the frame.

One thing that is very strange is during video playback the fast turning propeller on the planes looks warped and suspended in time from the 60 frames per second HD video.

The Sounds

I always forget how loud prop planes can be. Sometimes my levels were a little hot going into the SD-702. I never quite knew how loud a plane was going to be even though I’ve been doing this for a long time. Sometimes they ripped by and completely overwhelmed the limiter on the SD-702 and at times I was worried I was not going in hot enough. After a while I was able to make a best guess at it and it worked out OK. Win some, lose some.

There was a amazing Antonov plane that I wish was flying but the pilot was just showing it that day. It must be expensive and complicated to fly a plane like that. There was also a 1928 Stearman on display. This plane was not flying during the show but at the end of the day I was able to meet the owner and his friends (it takes more then one person to get these planes started). They were getting ready to fly home as I walked by after recording at the north end of the airport. I asked the pilot if I could record it and he said only if you give me the sound for my cell ringtone. “Deal” I told him. After they rolled it out and charged the starter she was running. He ran the engine at different RPMs until I gave him the thumbs up that I recorded enough for his ringtone. The engine run-up completely took me by surprise with my input levels. This plane is LOUD and I was very close to the engine. I adjusted it as the engine got louder and I hope to fix this level change in Pro-Tools before I send it up to him. There was a band performing behind me and the were close to finishing for they day but the pilot was ready to go and once the engine kicked in the music became inaudible. I would like to record this plane again in a private environment.

I was able to record some awesome high speed passes as the pilots were showing off their planes before a sightseeing trip over the lake. I did get a few landings with the tire squeak and quite a few ground taxi bys. I will say that I was attacked by these tiny red ants when I was out on the grass area at the north end of the airstrip. I must have stumbled on a nest and they were all over my pants inside and out. These guys can really bite you. All in all it was a great day and I will return next year and maybe they will have some jets… wishful thinking.

You can read about the 2010 air show recordings here
The 2010 air show sounds are available here
These air show sounds are available here

The Photos

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Sandpoint Idaho Fly In 2011

Prop Plane Recording August 14th 2010

August 14, 2010, Sandpoint, Idaho – Early Saturday morning I was out in the garden picking fresh raspberries and thinking about what I was going to do for the day when I heard this distant hum overhead. Then out of the blue, 3 bi-planes in formation flew very low over. I thought to myself “this is very strange way out here in the country” so I ran inside and searched the internet for any kind of air show event in North Idaho. I found The 6th annual Sandpoint Fly-In event was happening now.

With all that I had to do today the last thing I thought of doing was to gear up and go record. What the hell I thought, when you get the chance to record something cool, go get it. So, I packed up my CSS-5 and the 702 and headed for town.

When I got there dozens of prop planes were parked and flying around. There is always a band playing at these kind of events so I walked to the end of the runway where they start begin take-off. After a few minutes planes started pulling up and performing a quick engine run-up as they prepared for take off. Nobody really bothered me as I was standing in the scorching sun with a boom and a microphone. The airport security guys just waved as the drove by on ATV’s. Small town airports are great, you can wander around very close to the runway as long as you don’t step out on the runway.

I was able to get right up next to and behind the airplanes as they were getting ready for departure. I got some great recordings with minimal background destractions. Check them out below.

I really should have been painting the garage.

Prop plane engine starts, run-up’s and taxi by’s:

Vintage and stunt prop plane pass by’s:

Airplanes 2010

1941 Naval Aircraft Factory N3N-3 “Yellow Peril” (4417)

Airplanes 2010

1927 Curtiss Wright Travel Air 4000 (NC1499)

Airplanes 2010

1928 Boeing B-40C Mail plane. The only B-40-C flying & oldest Boeing flying

Airplanes 2010

1928 Boeing B-40C Mail plane. The only B-40-C flying & oldest Boeing flying

Airplanes 2010

1930 Laird model LC-1B-300 NC10402 engine running

Airplanes 2010

1930 Laird model LC-1B-300 NC10402 and Sanken CSS-5 Microphone

Images and sounds copyright 2010 Frank Bry – Creative Sound Design. All Rights Reserved.