Posts

Recording Large Fire Bursts 11-6-2010

This is the second installment for a series of blog posts following my recording of a new library I am releasing soon called Ultimate Fire. Last week I posted pictures and video of recording a traditional torch. This week shows me dumping various flammable liquids on a bed of coals that had burned quietly overnight.

I’ve been recording fire for this collection since 2007. So far I’ve recorded 10 gigabytes of raw material for this collection. I started out with small and medium size slash piles burning and have since recorded massive slash piles left over from a logging operation, burning bushes, small propane burners, propane torches, jet torches, various liquids on the ground and in containers and some large fire bursts which you will see in the video below.

Setting up and recording fire for this new Ultimate collection has been a lot of work, dangerous, but most of all a hell of a lot of fun. I will go into greater detail on the foolishness and techniques used shortly before the libary is released next month. Until then: Burn Baby Burn!

Some photos are here: Fire Recording Pics 11-07-2010

I like fire. Enjoy!

Recording set-up: Sound Devices 702, Sanken CSS-5, Fostex FR-2, Audio Technica AT-835ST recording at 24Bit/192kHz.

Ultimate Concrete SFX Library Pics

My photos from some of the recording sessions for my new SoundBox Professional sound effects library “Ultimate Concrete.” Recorded at 24-Bit/96kHz with a multitude of microphones and portable flash recorders over the last year in Sandpoint, Idaho.

I recorded way too many cement blocks, slabs, bricks, clay pots, debris drops, wheel barrel dumps, etc. A great way to keep in shape or throw out your back.

A special thanks goes out to my John Deere 4110 tractor which made the large concrete slab recordings possible.

https://therecordist.com/photos/ultimate-concrete-pics

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Ultimate Concrete

The story behind Ultimate Concrete:
A couple of winters ago North Idaho got more than the normal amount of snowfall. (What is normal in North Idaho?) 15 feet over the course of the winter to be exact. My garage has a metal roof that the snow would usually slide off of during the course of the winter. Well, the winter of 2008 it did not in the area around the chimney that was installed. One day it decided it was time to come down and took the top 6 feet  of the chimney with it. I wish I had a recorder running, it was quite a sound.

After the spring thaw I cleaned up the mess and set the 3 sections of the chimney aside. A few months later I started thinking of ways to use the large chimney chunks for a game project I was working on. I needed some hollow rock scraping sounds and I was off dragging the chunks around the driveway, and inside the garage. As usual, I could not get enough of this chimney and decided it was time to enlist the tractor for some drops and crashes.

I found quite a few cinderblocks around the back of the barn and came up with a way to pull the chinmey sections from the raised tractor bucket down onto the pile of cinderblocks. After a while I had a bunch of crushed cinderblocks laying around and that’s when it hit me….. Ultimate Concrete.

Over the course of the next year I recorded tons of other concrete sounds. My cement sidewalk that I tore up, more cinderblocks, sledghammer impacts, scrapes, movements, etc. My favorite was recording the sidewalk slabs, and a sore back would not stop me from having a great time!

Equipment Used:
Sound Devices 702
Fostex FR-2
Sony PCM-D1
Sony PCM-D50
Sanken CSS5
Audio Technica AT835-ST
John Deere 4110 Tractor
6 pairs of contractor gloves
Oban 14 year old single malt scotch